The Town Hall Assembly will be held at Wareham High School on Monday October 25

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WAREHAM – The Fall Town Reunion returns to the familiar surroundings of the Wareham High School auditorium on Monday, October 25 at 7 p.m. after COVID’s forced incursions into VFW, Spillane Field and Decas School for the last three TM.

The articles voters will be asked to decide whether to include the use of $ 250,000 in community preservation funds to fund the rehabilitation of the Joseph W. Conway Sr.-Swift’s Beach playground, requested by the Community Preservation Committee in Article 10.

Joan Kinniburgh, chair of the community preservation committee, told men that the $ 250,000 for the playground would go to the city to do the work. The city owns the playground. Total expenses for the work will be $ 260,000 and will include $ 10,000 in donations and fundraising.

Hazardous 30-year-old playground equipment has been removed and will be replaced with U.S. Disability Act compliant equipment and surfacing, a pickle ball court will be added, and the basketball court will be covered. and blackboards and rims will be installed. Landscaping will also be done.

Hazardous 30-year-old playground equipment has been removed and will be replaced with U.S. Disability Act compliant equipment and surfacing, a pickle ball court will be added, and the basketball court will be covered. and blackboards and rims will be installed.  Landscaping will also be done.  Work outside the red line is from a previous shot and is not part of the current work.

The developers hope to start work in the spring of 2022 and finish it that summer.

Section 11 would use $ 150,000 in community preservation funds for the restoration of the stone pier on Wickets Island and the installation of a floating dock. It was also requested by the Community Preservation Committee.

Kinniburgh said the total work of Wickets Island through the Buzzards Bay Coalition is $ 462,407, including PCA’s $ 150,000. The rest of the money comes from private donations and grants.

The total work of Wickets Island through the Buzzards Bay Coalition is $ 462,407, including CPA's $ 150,000.  The rest of the money comes from private donations and grants.

According to the proposal, the work will allow the Buzzards Bay Coalition “to host a variety of outdoor exploration and environment programs,” and “to increase public access to recreational experiences, to residents and visitors with recreational permits to fish and conquer seafood at Wickets Island, and allow vessels to be moored with maintenance equipment in emergency / safety situations.

BBC officials say this is the latest part of the campaign to provide high-quality aquatic recreational and educational activities for children and families accessible to all, regardless of income, including seat is at the Onset Bay Center on Onset Beach.

Voters will also be asked in Article 16 to authorize articles for municipal assembly submitted by majority vote of municipal councils, described as “any elected or appointed multi-member body,” to be included on municipal assembly mandates by municipal councils. elected. It was requested through a citizens’ petition and is also expected to be approved by the state legislature.

Clause 17 would change the composition and selection process of the Wareham Redevelopment Authority from that approved by special legislation in 2018. This provided for two selectmen chosen by the board for a one-year term, the administrator of the city, the director of town planning and an elector chosen by elected officials for a three-year term.

If approved, the article would require special legislation to be amended at the state level. He would create a board of directors of the WRA with seven members instead of five, including four members elected for five-year terms. Three members would be appointed by elected officials. Former Selectman Brenda Eckstrom presented the citizens’ petition.

Clause 18 would “urge” elected officials to use their authority to audit all past and current AD Makepeace Co. removal operations to determine the amount that has been removed and to collect fees owed to it. the city. Makepeace is said to be “urged” to provide proof that it has been used for agricultural purposes. Barry C. Cosgrove presented the petition. City attorney Rich Bowen said the article’s format looked more like a referendum than a city bylaw during a recent selection meeting. Selectman Peter Teitelbaum told the meeting that those with evidence of wrongdoing should bring it to the city’s inspection services, which can investigate complaints.

Section 19 would continue to broadcast city council meetings via Zoom. Jody Santagate presented the citizens’ petition. She said a positive thing that came out of the pandemic at a recent selection meeting is this way to expand public participation in city council meetings. Head coach Alan Slavin noted at a recent selection meeting that Zoom meetings were approved by the governor as an emergency COVID measure that will change at some point and recommended revisiting the idea at the meeting of spring of the city when the action of the governor in the matter could be known.

This petition has two parts. The second would prohibit boards from refusing to hear comments during public participation from people who have threatened to sue the city or who are filing an appeal against a council decision. They would not be allowed to speak if the issue at hand was “currently in court”.

Section 20 would reallocate the John W. Decas School “for community benefit”. The school will return to school district jurisdiction when the new East Wareham Primary School opens in 2020. Uses could include an aging council and senior center, town hall space, adult education , veterans services, affordable seniors housing, recreation, youth and sports programs, child care, small business, and health and wellness services.

“The uses, space allocation and location of the property will be determined by a committee of seven city citizens, which will initially be made up of the first seven names from the signatories page used to place this petition item. On the city Meeting mandate, according to the article. City attorney Bowen said at a recent screening meeting that the language used in the article in two places is unlikely to pass legal scrutiny.

Section 20 would reallocate the John W. Decas School “for community benefit”.

He calls for changing a motion from a 2020 municipal assembly that places property under the authority of some when it is no longer needed as a school. However, this approved motion cannot be changed in this way. The language conferring on the committee of seven authority over the use of the building is also ambiguous and could give the impression that the committee was awarded that authority for presenting the petition.

A subsidized study on the reuse of Decas completed in November by the Southeast Regional Planning and Economic Development District concluded that its best commercial use would be as office development with the flexibility to add scientific research or research and development components.

It would provide the city with income and new jobs, according to the study. A 170,000 square foot building could generate $ 219,000 in annual tax revenue and 270 jobs, according to SRPEDD estimates.

The current 70,000 square foot school building would be razed to make way for the new building.

There are other possible commercial uses described in the study, including medical offices.

Grant King, SRPEDD’s director of comprehensive planning and housing, said in a February meeting with Selectmen that the 15.5-acre site at 760 Main Street was large enough to accommodate commercial development as well as a community center, a public security institution or a senior’s housing. “They are not mutually exclusive.


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